The history of the pit stop

Red Bull does some interesting work creating TV programming, with its own Red Bull Media House, and working in league with affiliates and with co-production partners such as David Coulthard’s Whisper Films. These are designed for the cinema and downstream channels such as DVD, VOD and TV. The latest offering is a 45 minute documentary entitled The History of the Pit Stop, which was first broadcast on Red Bull TV a few days ago. If you have the time available, it is worth watching. You can see it here.

32 thoughts on “The history of the pit stop

  1. Thanks for posting that link Joe – well worth 45 mins of my or anyone’s time, and great that they got the ever innovative Gordon Murray involved!

  2. An interesting stuff. The funniest moment came when DC’ Scottish suddenly changed to MW’s Aussie’s šŸ™‚ – Nevertheless Red Bull are doing really good job, don’t You agree? Not only for themselves, but for F1 in general.(hence Ricciardo’s all sorts of fun stuff alone)

  3. Coming soon to a cinema near you, a continuing series starring Coulthard and Red Bull:

    History of the Race Start

    History of the Gear Change

    History of the Chequered Flag

    History of the Post Race Interview

    all courtesy of Coulthard and RB Productions Inc

    1. Sigh . It never fails . Theres always at least one in the bunch . I mean come on Pol .. regardless of your opinion when it comes to Red Bull the company and DM the man there is no denying this a a brilliant and well done film worthy of even ole dogs like myself’s time to watch .

  4. Excellent video and history; thanks for the link. One thing did leap out at me while watching and that was that there was no video of current F1. No actual pit stops or racing. I guess CVC wouldn’t let them use any, which is stupid in itself with a great promotional video like this. Verstappen’s fire certainly would have been more dramatic if they could have shown it instead of a computer simulation and a still picture!

    1. I don’t suppose it would be so easy to do, but all they need is a website with all the archives up, the lot, available between the last race of this, and first race of next year, and I can’t even think what a effect that would have on attendance for the new season. There’s something fishy about professionals shy of past work, as if there was something wrong about it. Artists may have their reasons to stop old things being shown, but mostly that is not a good thing for all. I only say “put the lot up” because I fear I’ll get fed up by some kind of maximising drip feed through channels I am not certain I want to be stuck with. And because I wish they would look only to the future, for making money, not reap second crops from fields that should be rotated. Let the past out, and people will want to future the more, I’m certain.

  5. This is exactly what Bernie / F1 is completely failing to do – get regular shows of this quality out on the net for free, advertise them and actually market the sport….

  6. Damn right Joe; it WAS well worth watching. Thanks for the heads-up. One of the bits that stuck in my mind was that ever-so-tiny glimpse into the Benetton pit of the 1994 season and the removal of the filter used during their title winning season. Interesting stuff….ummm.?

  7. Wow! Excellent viewing. Very informative show and exactly the sort of thing FOM should be providing Free of Charge (If they could imagine such a thing!) to the millions of fans who pay for the severely restricted content they hide behind paywalls. Take note, Mr Carey (regulatory approval permitting) and thank you for sharing Joe.

  8. Absolutely fantastic video,thanks for sharing Joe.

    Let’s hope D.C. will not be lost to Formula One when the races are entirely behind the pay wall. The best (and) worst thing about this weekend’s race is that I can listen to the commentary on free to air with the best two commentators. The worst element is that both pre shows are just as much talking about nothing in particular to pass the time.

    Now if there were more features like this excellent video!!!

    Kyalami 1983 brought back such memories, I remember Nelson Piqued running away and hiding, then when the Renault expired he just took it easy to win the championship. Nike Lauda would have won, but his turbo expired with a handful of laps to go.

  9. Thanks for this Joe. Great footage from yesteryear etc.

    Comment at 42.58… good point well made.

    Faster pit stops are good for results, but kill entertainment they’re too fast. I like my entertainment to last a while.

    As for the safety issues, how far can it go before it kills the game? It’s an inherently dangerous game and there’s no obligation to play. The crews do so because it’s what they want to do – knowing the risks. I put this to Sir Jackie a few years ago, and (part of) his response was that he couldn’t argue with my logic.

  10. What a fabulous doco. And what a shame that FOM won’t allow archival footage to be used for something that adds value to and promotes F1…

  11. Great video!
    Now in the absence of a suitable thread and since the FIA news page does not have a comments facility I would only say that the awards for humanitarian of the year are disturbing evidence of diversion of the FIA’s real purpose. Indeed only Ziyi Zang need be added to the official photo for a remake of “Sleeping FIA hidden Governance.”

  12. Goood documentary but totally overlooked the influence of Woods Brothers in the 1965 with Lotus at the Indy 500. Chapman saw how they worked at Indianapolis and in NASCAR and brought back many techniques. They were the real group who made strategic pit stops possible.

  13. A great recommend of a well done film with some pretty heavy weight folks [ no pun intended ] lending their talents to it . So molto grazie … with a moment of melancholy .. sigh … back in the days when men were – men – racing was truly innovative and a sport – and the safety nannies had yet to come to the fore .

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